Category Archives: UCLA All-Time Records

UCLA’s Washington, Strode Snubbed By All NFL Teams At 1940 Draft

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No fewer than five former UCLA BRUINS players were invited to the very first training camp of the fledgling LOS ANGELES RAMS, the National Football League franchise that had just completed its move from Cleveland, that was held at Compton College in the summer of 1946. Pictured in the front row are guard JACK FINLAY (# 17), guard NATE DEFRANCISCO (# 10) as well as end WOODY STODE (# 34) with halfback KENNY WASHINGTON (# 13) standing next to quarterback BOB WATERRFIELD (# 7) in the back. Neither of the two offensive linemen made the final roster cut for Los Angeles in 1946 but the resilient Finlay went on to play five seasons for the Rams and, along with Waterfield, became an NFL champion in 1951.
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From the modern day perspective, it is inconceivable to think that any college player who competed in one of the six so-called “power” conferences and led the entire NCAA in total offense (combined yards rushing & passing) during his senior season would be completely passed over by every single professional team at the subsequent National Football League Draft.

Sadly, such was the case for extremely talented UCLA left halfback KENNY WASHINGTON, who led the entire nation with 1,370 yards of total offense while accounting for 12 touchdowns (five rushing, seven passing) on behalf of a quality Bruins side that went unbeaten in ten games (six wins, four draws) and finished the 1939 NCAA campaign as the # 7 ranked team in the country according to the Associated Press.

Given the physical attributes and on-field accomplishments of UCLA left end WOODY STRODE, who led the Bruins in 1939 with 15 receptions for 218 yards (14.5 avg) and two touchdowns while establishing himself as one of the nation’s better downfield pass-catching threats, it is rather absurd to think that no NFL club wanted the services of such a tall, agile receiver (6’4″ 195 lbs) who was also a dominant player on the defensive side of the ball, as well.

Perhaps the very best argument to be made with respect to why Strode and Washington both deserved to have their names called at the 1940 NFL Draft is reflected by the fact, after being senselessly barred for six seasons by the National Football League only because of the color of their skin, the pair were still gifted enough to play at the very highest level of the professional football game after finally being signed to contracts by the Los Angeles Rams in 1946.

Getting back to the 1940 NFL Draft, there is little doubt that UCLA Bruins star left halfback Kenny Washington should have been a first round selection at the minimum and, indeed, a strong case could be made that the homegrown senior out of Lincoln High School in Los Angeles might very well have been the very first pick overall had circumstances with respect to basic civil rights been an entirely different matter.

1940 NFL DRAFT – FIRST ROUND
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HB – George Cafego ……… Tennessee ……………. Chicago Cardinals
HB – George McAfee …….. Duke …………………… Philadelphia Eagles
QB – Kay Eakin …………….. Arkansas ……………… Pittsburgh Steelers
HB – Banks McFadden ….. Clemson ………………. Brooklyn Dodgers
HB – Olie Cordill …………… Rice …………………….. Cleveland Rams
QB – Doyle Nave …………… USC …………………….. Detroit Lions
OC – Clyde Turner ………… Hardin-Simmons ….. Chicago Bears
QB – Ed Boell ………………… New York Univ …….. Washington Redskins
HB – Hal van Every ……….. Minnesota ……………. Green Bay Packers
QB – Grenville Lansdell ….. USC …………………….. New York Giants

This blog has already taken the time to analyzed the three-year collegiate careers of UCLA Bruins left halfback KENNY WASHINGTON and USC Trojans quarterback GRENVILLE LANSDELL in greater detail :

https://lvironpigs.wordpress.com/2014/12/06/kenny-vs-grenny-highlights-historic-1939-ucla-vs-ucla-clash/

The comparison between Tennessee’s Cafego and UCLA’s Washington is an interesting one, to say the least. As this blog shall analyze in more detail in a future post, Cafego was cited as a First, Second or Third Team All-America in 1939 by nine of the fifteen major accredited organizations studied closely by this blog whereas Washington was named All-America by eleven of those very same entities. It is true that Cafego (6’0″ 174 lbs) was somewhat limited by injury during 1939 NCAA season but the cumulative three-year collegiate statistics of the two players also strongly favor Washington (6’1″ 195 lbs) :

* Cafego gained 1,643 net yards rushing (5.9 avg) and scored 9 total touchdowns for Volunteers teams that went 27-4-1 in three seasons (1937-39) while the far more durable Washington amassed 1,914 net yards rushing (4.2 avg) and tallied 16 total touchdowns (including one on a pass reception and another on defense via a fumble return) on behalf of Bruins teams that went 14-10-6 during his varsity career — as was also the case for Lansdell at USC, Cafego had the distinct advantage of working with much better overall blocking at Tennessee than Washington did at UCLA; as it was, the Volunteers had two different interior linemen who were named First Team All-America by at least four major accredited organizations in 1939 and two other interior linemen who were selected by professional teams at the 1940 NFL Draft.

* Cafego completed 49 of 105 career attempts and totaled 550 yards passing with three touchdowns for Tennessee but the rocket-armed Washington completed 92 of 228 career attempts and totaled 1,268 yards passing with 14 touchdowns for UCLA; the Volunteers left halfback had a better completion percentage (46.67% to 40.35%) but the Bruins left halfback averaged more yards per completion (13.78 to 11.22) and had a much better percentage of completions for touchdowns (15.22% to 6.12%) — these particular facts are all the more relevant considering the widely-publicized premium on backs who could effectively throw the football forward that NFL teams, as a whole, were placing on players at that exact moment in time.

* Cafego intercepted five passes as a safety in his career but was nowhere near the influential force for Tennessee on the defensive side of the football that UCLA enjoyed with the likes of Washington, who was continually cited in contemporary newspaper reports game after game for having been involved in a high number of tackles — furthermore, the explosive Washington still holds the Westwood school record for yards gained per interception return (37.7 avg) after picking off six passes during his three seasons with the Bruins.

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Former UCLA Bruins left end WOODY STRODE (# 34), the homegrown product out of Roosevelt High School in Los Angeles who caught five touchdown passes in his collegiate career and was bestowed with First Team All-Pacific Coast in addition to Honorable Mention All-America status by the Associated Press as a senior in 1939, focuses on the football during a training camp session with the Natonal Football League’s Los Angeles Rams in the summer of 1946.
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It is certainly very interesting to note that during his three-year varsity career, UCLA Bruins left end WOODY STRODE played against eight of the top twenty ends chosen by the professional teams at the 1940 National Football League Draft. More specifically, as a senior in 1939, the UCLA left end Strode went head-to-head with four future NFL draft picks who featured at right end for their respective college teams — DURWOOD HORNER from the Texas Christian University Horned Frogs, VIC REGINATO from the Oregon Ducks, BILL ANAHU from the Santa Clara Broncos and BOB WINSLOW from the USC Trojans. In each instance, Strode distinguished himself on both sides of the ball as the Bruins beat defending national champion TCU (6-2) and Oregon (16-6) before battling to action-packed if pointless draws with both nationally-ranked Santa Clara and powerful cross-town rival USC.

According to the line-up chart in the post-game report of The Daily Iowan newspaper, Strode also went head-to-head with another would-be NFL draft pick, ERWIN PRESSE from the Iowa Hawkeyes, as a junior in 1938. In that game, Presse provided visiting Iowa with an early second quarter lead by kicking a 22-yard field goal but Strode made a critical play for UCLA late in the first half by recovering a fumble by 1939 Heisman Trophy winner NILE KINNICK in the end zone for the go-ahead touchdown. At the beginning of the second half, Strode broke through the Hawkeyes line and blocked a punt to set the stage for the Bruins’ second touchdown and further pave the way towards UCLA’s 27-3 rout.

http://dailyiowan.lib.uiowa.edu/DI/1938/di1938-09-24.pdf

There is no question that the UCLA left end Woody Strode was in the same class as several other players whom the NFL teams ultimately judged to be among the most valuable at the end position :

TOP TWENTY ENDS CHOSEN AT 1940 NFL DRAFT
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# 12 – (2nd rd) ….. Ralph Wenzel …… Tulane ………………. Pittsburgh
# 21 – (3rd rd) …… Bill Fisk ……………. USC ………………….. Detroit
# 22 – (3rd rd) …… Ken Kavanaugh … Louisiana State …. Chicago Bears
# 26 – (4th rd) …… John Shirk ……….. Oklahoma …………. Chicago Cards
# 27 – (4th rd) …… Pop Ivy ……………. Oklahoma …………. Pittsburgh
# 29 – (4th rd) …… Bill Bailey …………. Duke ………………… Brooklyn
# 36 – (5th rd) …… Esko Sarkkinen …. Ohio State ………… Green Bay
# 40 – (5th rd) …… Carl Tomasello …. Scranton …………… New York
# 41 – (6th rd) …… Vic Reginato ……… Oregon ……………… Chicago Cards
# 55 – (7th rd) …… Bob Nowaskey …… Wash & Lee ………. Cleveland
# 56 – (7th rd) …… Bob Winslow ……… USC …………………. Detroit
# 63 – (8th rd) …… Don Looney ……….. Texas Christian … Philadelphia
# 65 – (8th rd) …… Bill Anahu ………….. Santa Clara ………. Cleveland
# 68 – (8th rd) …… Roland Orf …………. Missouri …………… Washington
# 69 – (8th rd) …… George Seeman …… Nebraska …………. Green Bay
# 96 – (11th rd) ….. Erwin Prasse ………. Iowa ………………… Detroit
# 100 – (11th rd) … John McKibben ….. Tulsa ……………….. New York
# 103 – (12th rd) … Durwood Horner … Texas Christian … Philadelphia
# 107 – (12th rd) … Bill McCubbin …….. Kentucky …………. Chicago Bears
# 111 – (13th rd) …. Al Coppage …………. Oklahoma ………… Chicago Cards

Altogether, 33 ends were among the 200 players to have their professional rights reserved by the ten teams participating at the 1940 NFL Draft. It should be noted that Chicago Bears ninth round (# 77 overall) draft pick HAMPTON POOL from Stanford University is typically listed as and end in most historical records. But the beefy Pool (6’3″ 221 lbs) was an interior lineman stationed at guard for the Indians in college and is listed at that position in contemporary newspapers such as The Milwaukee Journal (December 10th, 1939).

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Establishing UCLA’s Career Rushing Record

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One of the most noteworthy facts about the playing career of UCLA Bruins standout KENNY WASHINGTON (# 13) is that it took 33 years for someone to finally break the consensus All-America left halfback’s school record for career rushing yardage — this particular bullet point becomes all the more impressive when one considers the rapid development of offensive strategies & tactics as well as the elimination of the “single platoon” system of limited substitution that occurred during this very same time span …… the career rushing totals of the UCLA Bruins’ all-time leading ground-gainer at present, JOHNATHAN FRANKLIN (# 23), benefited from the contemporary offensive formations that feature but a single running back far more so than from the additional number of games played as a result of lengthened season schedules.
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ESTABLISHING THE UCLA CAREER RUSHING RECORD
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1,539 yrd …. 5.1 avg … 1933-35 …….. Chuck CHESHIRE
1,914 yrd …. 4.2 avg … 1937-39 ……. Kenny WASHINGTON
2,495 yrd …. 6.7 avg … 1971-73 ……. Kermit JOHNSON
3,181 yrd ….. 6.0 avg … 1973-76 …… Wendell TYLER
3,195 yrd ….. 5.3 avg … 1977-80 …… Freeman MCNEIL
3,731 yrd ….. 5.3 avg … 1984-87 …… Gaston GREEN
4,403 yrd …. 5.6 avg … 2009-12 …… Johnathan FRANKLIN

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UCLA Bruins halfback WENDELL TYLER (# 22), who was taken by the hometown Los Angeles Rams in the third round of the 1977 National Football League Draft, broke Kenny Washington’s long held school record for rushing attempts in a single season as a junior in 1975 and, in doing so, also became the very first player in the Westwood school’s history ever to exceed 1,000 yards rushing in a single season … UCLA Bruins tailback FREEMAN MCNEIL (# 24) was the third overall player chosen when snapped up by the New York Jets in the first round of the 1981 NFL Draft, this after the Los Angeles native had done enough to ensure that his predecessor’s reign as the Westwood school’s rushing king was a rather short-lived one.
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UCLA CAREER RUSHING LEADERS
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4,403 yrd … 5.6 avg ……. Johnathan FRANKLIN (2009-12)
3,731 yrd …. 5.3 avg ……. Gaston GREEN (1984-87)
3,195 yrd …. 5.3 avg ……. Freeman MCNEIL (1977-80)
3,194 yrd …. 4.4 avg …… DeShaun FOSTER (1998-01)
3,182 yrd ….. 5.2 avg …… Karim ABDUL-JABBAR (1992-95)
3,181 yrd ….. 6.0 avg …… Wendell TYLER (1973-76)
3,140 yrd …. 4.9 avg …… Skip HICKS (1993-94, 96-97)
2,954 yrd …. 5.5 avg …… Theotis BROWN (1975-78)
2,773 yrd …. 4.7 avg …… Chris MARKEY (2004-07)
2,583 yrd …. 4.5 avg …… Kevin NELSON (1980-83)
2,503 yrd …. 5.2 avg …… Maruice JONES-DREW (2003-05)
2,495 yrd …. 6.7 avg …… Kermit JOHNSON (1971-73)
2,215 yrd …. 5.3 avg …… Kevin WILLIAMS (1989-92)
2,148 yrd …. 5.6 avg …… Paul PERKINS (2013-14)
2,099 yrd …. 4.6 avg …… Brian BROWN (1987-90)
2,074 yrd …. 5.0 avg ….. James OWENS (1975-78)
1,984 yrd …. 4.9 avg …… Eric BALL (1985-88)
1,915 yrd …. 4.2 avg …… Kenny WASHINGTON (1937-39)
1,899 yrd …. 4.9 avg …… Greg JONES (1967-69)
1,814 yrd …. 4.4 avg …… Manuel WHITE (2001-04)
1,813 yrd …. 4.9 avg …… John SCIARRA (1972-75)
1,780 yrd …. 5.2 avg …… Derrick COLEMAN (2008-11)
1,747 yrd …. 3.6 avg …… Brett HUNDLEY (2012-14)
1,741 yrd …. 4.4 avg …… Kahlil BELL (2005-08)
1,716 yrd ….. 6.0 avg …… Mel FARR (1964-66)
1,644 yrd …. 4.1 avg ……. Danny ANDREWS (1981-84)
1,539 yrd ….. 5.3 avg …… Chuck CHESHIRE (1933-35)
1,495 yrd ….. 4.3 avg …… Tyler EBELL (2002-03)
1,492 yrd ….. 5.3 avg …… James MCALISTER (1972-73)
1,458 yrd ….. 4.0 avg …… Paul CAMERON (1951-53)

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UCLA Bruins halfback THEOTIS BROWN (# 27), who became a second round selection of the St. Louis Cardinals at the 1979 National Football League Draft, did not carry the football from scrimmage even one time during his freshman campaign in 1975 (the very same season that saw underdog UCLA dump the unbeaten and untied Ohio State Buckeyes in the annual Rose Bowl Game on New Year’s Day) but then went on to average an impressive 84.40 yards rushing per game over the course of his last three years with Westwood’s gridiron warriors … It took 34 years for someone to come along and finally unseat UCLA Bruins tailback GASTON GREEN (# 44) as the Westwood school’s career rushing king; however, Green, who was the very first running back chosen at the 1988 NFL Draft when selected in the first round by the hometown Los Angeles Rams, still holds the UCLA school record having rushed for 100 or more yards in a single game a total of twenty times during his distinguished collegiate career.
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UCLA BRUINS CAREER RUSHING LEADERS – YARDS PER GAME
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83.07 yrds per game ….. 53 games …… Johnathan FRANKLIN
82.62 yrds per game ….. 26 games …… Paul PERKINS
77.73 yrds per game ….. 48 games …… Gaston GREEN
71.00 yrds per game ….. 45 games …… Freeman MCNEIL
69.43 yrds per game ….. 46 games …… Deshaun FOSTER
69.22 yrds per game ….. 32 games …… Kermit JOHNSON
69.17 yrds per game ….. 46 games …… Karim ABDUL-JABBAR
69.15 yrds per game ….. 46 games …… Wendell TYLER
68.26 yrds per game ….. 46 games …… Skip HICKS
67.81 yrds per game ….. 22 games …… James MCALISTER
65.87 yrds per game ….. 38 games …… Maurice JONES-DREW
63.30 yrds per game ….. 30 games …… Greg JONES
62.85 yrds per game ….. 47 games …… Theotis BROWN
61.77 yrds per game …… 31 games …… Kenny WASHINGTON
59.80 yrds per game ….. 25 games …… Tyler EBELL

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Establishing UCLA’s Single-Season Total Offense Record

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Since the NCAA first started officially keeping formal track of gridiron football statistics in 1937, there have been exactly eight UCLA Bruins who have been able to reset the Westwood school’s record for total offensive yardage (rushing & passing) in a single season :

1,025 yards … 210 plays … 1937 …… Kenny Washington
1,370 yards … 260 plays … 1939 …… Kenny Washington
1,482 yards … 293 plays … 1951 …… Paul Cameron
1,889 yards … 292 plays … 1960 …… Billy Kilmer
2,073 yards … 326 plays … 1965 …… Gary Beban
2,305 yards … 423 plays … 1970 …… Dennis Dummit
3,124 yards … 470 plays … 1982 …… Tom Ramsey
3,142 yards … 391 plays …. 1997 …… Cade McNown
3,652 yards … 432 plays … 1998 ……. Cade McNown
4,095 yards … 638 plays … 2012 …… Brett Hundley

It has always been rather difficult to make meaningful comparisons between football players from different time periods. This is due to a number of different factors, the most influential of which is, perhaps, the evolutionary nature of the game of football, itself. Changes to the playing rules of the game, varying lengths of the annual season schedule as well as strategic & tactical innovations all must be considered carefully.

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Although Brett Hundley came extremely close as a redshirt freshman just a few years back, it is southpaw slinger CADE MCNOWN (# 18) who remains the only UCLA Bruins player in the Westwood school’s distinguished history who has been able to average more than three hundred yards of total offense per game for the length of an entire football season.
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UCLA Single-Season Total Offense Record, Yards Per Game
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102.50 yards per game … 1937 …… Kenny Washington – soph
137.00 yards per game … 1939 …… Kenny Washington – sr
164.67 yards per game … 1951 …… Paul Cameron – soph
188.90 yards per game … 1960 …… Billy Kilmer – sr
209.55 yards per game … 1970 …… Dennis Dummit – sr
260.33 yards per game … 1982 …… Tom Ramsey – sr
304.33 yards per game … 1998 …… Cade McNown – sr

It is certainly very interesting to observe that there have been eight Bruins players who have re-established the UCLA school record for net total offensive yardage gained in a single season but, in contrast, there are only six Westwood gridiron warriors who have ever been able to reset the school’s single-season mark for average net total offensive yards per game. T-formation quarterback GARY BEBAN, who ultimately won the Heisman Trophy awarded to the nation’s very best collegian player in 1967, became the very first Bruins player ever to exceed 2,000 yards of total offense in a single season in 1965 but his average yards per game (188.45) was fractionally short of the school record which had been already been set in 1960 by Single Wing left halfback BILLY KILMER. Similarly, “spread formation” quarterback BRETT HUNDLEY became the very first UCLA player to accumulate more than 4,000 yards of total offense in a single campaign but his average yards per game (292.50) was still almost a dozen yards shy of the existing school record set in 1998 by Rose Bowl quarterback CADE MCNOWN.

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Operating as one of two halfbacks in head coach Pepper Rodgers’ powerful Wishbone offense, UCLA Bruins speedster KERMIT JOHNSON (# 37) broke a long held Westwood school record for total offense which had gone unbroken for three decades by averaging more than seven and a half yards per carry as a senior in 1973; after gaining 1,129 yards on the ground in his final collegiate season, the running back who was chosen First Team All-America in 1973 by three major accredited organizations also broke Kenny Washington’s formidable UCLA school record for career rushing yards, a rather durable mark which had gone unchallenged for 33 years.
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UCLA Single-Season Total Offense Record, Yards Per Play
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5.099 yrds per play … 1937 ……. Kenny Washington
5.269 yrds per play … 1939 ……. Kenny Washington
7.090 yrds per play … 1942 …… Bob Waterfield
7.527 yrds per play … 1973 ……. Kermit Johnson
8.036 yrds per play … 1997 ……. Cade McNown
8.454 yrds per play … 1998 ……. Cade McNown

(minimum of 100 plays, rushing / passing, per season)

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UCLA vs USC : All-Time Attendance

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UCLA Bruins left end WOODY STRODE (# 27), the homegrown senior out of Roosevelt High School in Los Angeles who was a First Team All-Pacific Coast choice as well an an Honorable Mention All-America selection of the Associated Press in 1939, is tackled near the goal line after recovering the fumble of USC Trojans star quarterback GRENVILLE LANSDELL (# 78) in the end zone during the first quarter of the legendary contest watched by the record-setting crowd of 103,303 spectators at the Memorial Coliseum on December 9, 1939. It was not for another half century that advancing a fumble that had already made contact with the turf was legalized in collegiate football, so Strode’s attempt to run with the ball here was, in fact, all for naught. Other visible USC players in the photo include, from left to right, include Trojans left end BILL FISK (# 50), left tackle HOWARD STOECKER (# 78) and right end BOB WINSLOW (# 73).
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12/09/1939 …….. 103,303 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
09/21/1945 …….. 103,000 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/20/1954 …….. 102,548 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/22/1947 …….. 102,050 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/19/1988 ……… 100,741 ……… Rose Bowl, Pasadena
12/01/1945 …….. 100,300 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/22/1986 ……….. 98,370 ……… Rose Bowl, Pasadena
11/17/1990 ……….. 98,088 ……… Rose Bowl, Pasadena
11/22/1952 ……….. 96,859 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/19/1955 ……….. 95,878 ………. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/20/1982 ……….. 95,762 ……… Rose Bowl, Pasadena
11/21/1965 ……….. 94,085 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/23/1946 ……….. 93,714 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/25/2011 ……….. 93,607 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/20/1993 ……….. 93,458 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/22/2003 ……….. 93,172 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/21/1987 ………… 92,516 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
12/03/2005 ………. 92,000 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/19/1994 ………… 91,815 ………. Rose Bowl, Pasadena
12/01/2007 ……….. 91,553 ………. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/20/1999 ………… 91,384 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/18/1995 ………… 91,363 ………. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/22/1997 ………… 91,350 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/18/1995 ………… 91,316 ………. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/22/2002 ……….. 91,084 ……… Rose Bowl, Pasadena
11/22/1969 ………… 90,814 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/18/1967 ………… 90,772 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
12/02/2006 ……….. 90,622 ……… Rose Bowl, Pasadena
11/20/1976 ………… 90,519 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/17/1984 ………… 90,096 ……… Rose Bowl, Pasadena
11/23/1985 ………… 90,064 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/18/1978 ………… 90,387 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/26/1936 ………… 90,000 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
12/12/1942 ………… 90,000 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/21/1981 …………. 89,432 …….. Memorial Colisuem, Los Angeles
11/17/2001 ………… 88,588 ……… Memorial Colisuem, Los Angeles
12/04/2004 ………. 88,442 ……… Rose Bowl, Pasadena
11/24/1979 ………… 88,214 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/21/1998 …………. 88,080 …….. Rose Bowl, Pasadena
11/24/1973 ………… 88,024 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
12/06/2008 ……….. 87,790 ……… Rose Bowl, Pasadena
11/24/1962 ………… 86,740 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/18/1989 …………. 86,672 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/25/1977 …………. 86,168 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/30/2013 ………… 86,037 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/21/1959 …………. 85,917 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/28/2009 ………… 85,713 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/21/1953 …………. 85,366 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/23/1991 …………. 84,623 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/19/1983 …………. 83,763 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/22/1980 …………. 83,491 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/17/2012 …………. 83,277 …….. Rose Bowl, Pasadena
11/18/1972 …………. 82,929 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/23/1974 …………. 82,467 ……. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/30/1963 …………. 82,460 ……. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/22/2014 …………. 82,431 ……. Rose Bowl, Pasadena
11/19/1966 …………. 81,980 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
09/21/1945 ………… 81,000 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/28/1975 …………. 80,928 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/23/1996 …………. 80,644 ……. Rose Bowl, Pasadena
11/21/1992 …………. 80,568 …….. Rose Bowl, Pasadena
11/18/2000 ………… 80,227 …….. Rose Bowl, Pasadena
11/21/1970 …………. 78,773 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/24/1944 ………… 77,903 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/20/1948 ………… 76,577 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/23/1968 …………. 75,088 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/19/1949 …………. 75,026 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
12/04/1937 ………… 75,000 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/24/1951 …………. 71,738 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
12/04/2010 ………… 71,105 ……… Rose Bowl, Pasadena
11/30/1940 ………… 70,000 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/20/1971 …………. 68,426 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/19/1960 …………. 66,865 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/24/1938 ………… 65,000 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
12/06/1941 ………… 65,000 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/23/1957 ………… 64,818 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/24/1956 ………… 63,709 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/21/1964 ………… 62,108 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
09/23/1944 ……….. 60,000 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/22/1958 ………… 58,507 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/25/1961 ………… 57,580 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/25/1950 ………… 51,906 ……… Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/28/1929 ………… 50,000 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
09/25/1943 ……….. 50,000 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/27/1930 ………… 40,000 ……. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles
11/27/1943 ………… 35,000 …….. Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles

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All-Time UCLA Bruins : Interception & Fumble Return Touchdowns

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ALL-TIME UCLA BRUINS : INTERCEPTION & FUMBLE RETURN TDS
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Jimmy Allen ……………………….. 100 yrd int vs California, 1973
Alan Dial …………………………….. 100 yrd int vs Oregon State, 1986
Dennis Price ……………………….. 100 yrd int vs California, 1987
Phil Parslow ………………………….. 98 yrd int vs Illinois, 1958
Abdul McCullough …………………. 98 yrd int vs Arizona State, 1994
Ishmael Adams ………………………. 96 yrd int vs Colorado, 2015
Hal Hirshon …………………………… 95 yrd int vs Stanford, 1937
Jerry Robinson ……………………… 95 yrd int vs Minnesota, 1977
Ishmael Adams ……………………… 95 yrd int vs Arizona State, 2014
J. Ryland (K. Washington) …… * 90 yrd int vs Missouri, 1937
Alterraun Verner …………………… 89 yrd int vs Arizona, 2006
Ron Carver ……………………………. 85 yrd int vs Tennessee, 1970
Dave Brown …………………………… 80 yrd fumble vs USC, 1943
Alterraun Verner …………………… 76 yrd int vs California, 2007
Alton McSween ……………………… 75 yrd int vs California, 1972
Levi Armstrong ……………………… 75 yrd int vs Arizona, 1976
Raymond Bell ………………………… 75 yrd int vs Oregon Stae, 1977
Randall Goforth …………………….. 75 yrd fumble vs Virginia, 2014
Jerry Robinson ……………………… 72 yrd int vs Washington State, 1976
Don Stalwick …………………………. 70 yrd int ret vs Washington State, 1953
Jerry Robinson ……………………… 69 yrd int vs Stanford, 1976
Alterraun Verner …………………… 68 yrd int vs Arizona State, 2009
Pat Pinkston ………………………….. 66 yrd int vs Washington State, 1956
Dave Dobrow …………………………. 65 yrd int vs Montana, 1946
Blanchard Montgomery …………. 65 yrd int vs Washington State, 1982
Craig Rutledge ……………………….. 65 yrd int vs Brigham Young, 1985
Marcus Turner ………………………. 65 yrd int vs Oregon, 1987

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Considering that legendary UCLA linebacker JERRY ROBINSON (# 84), the first and still only one of two Bruins to ever be recognized as consensus First Team All-America three times, was recruited as a wide receiver and spent almost all of his freshman season playing at that position before switching over to the other side of the ball in the month prior to the now-famous 1976 Rose Bowl game against the then-undefeated Ohio State Buckeyes under Woody Hayes, it should, perhaps, have come as no surprise that it was, indeed, Robinson who became the very first player in school history ever to score three defensive touchdowns in a varsity career — astonishingly enough, Robinson averaged a whopping 78.67 yards on the trio of interceptions returned for eighteen points.
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Carlton Gray ………………………….. 65 yrd int vs Washington, 1989
Nikosi Littleton ……………………… 65 yrd int vs Arizona, 1993
Dennis Price ………………………….. 63 yrd int vs USC, 1984
Brian Baggott …………………………. 62 yrd int vs California, 1978
Brian Baggott …………………………. 61 yrd int vs California, 1978
Kenny Easley …………………………. 62 yrd int vs Oregon State, 1980
Dennis Keyes …………………………. 60 yrd int vs Washington, 2007
J. Roesch (B. Waterfield) ……… * 56 yrd int vs St. Mary’s, 1944
Jason Zdenek …………………………. 56 yrd int vs Stanford, 2000
Trey Brown ……………………………. 56 yrd int vs Brigham Young, 2007
Rodney Leisle ………………………… 55 yrd int vs Arizona, 2003
Darryl Henley ………………………… 54 yrd fumble vs Arizona, 1986
Eric Turner ……………………………. 54 yrd int vs Stanford, 1987
Julius Williams ………………………. 53 yrd int vs Boise State, 1999
Bill Murphy ……………………………. 52 yrd int vs Oregon State, 1935
Mike Molina …………………………… 52 yrd int vs Oregon, 1977
Spencer Havner ……………………… 52 yrd int vs San Diego State, 2004
Abdul McCullough ………………….. 51 yrd int vs Tennessee, 1996
Jerry Whitney ………………………… 50 yrd int vs Stanford, 1947
Marcus Turner ……………………….. 50 yrd int vs Long Beach State, 1988
Stacy Argo ……………………………… 48 yrd int vs Arizona State, 1989
John Peterson ………………………… 47 yrd int vs Oregon State, 1953
Mark Gustafson ……………………… 46 yrd int vs Pitt, 1967
Ron Pitts ………………………………… 46 yrd int vs Arizona State, 1984
Bill Murphy ……………………………. 45 yrd int vs St. Mary’s, 1933

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MARCUS TURNER, who remains tied for fourth place in UCLA school history with Don Rogers, Eric Turner and Rahim Moore having intercepted 14 passes in his collegiate career, became the very first Bruins defensive back to ever score three defensive touchdowns after lugging an interception the distance against Long Beach State in 1988 … Turner later carved out a respectable seven-year career with the Phoenix Cardinals and New York Jets in the crack National Football League despite being chosen rather late (11th round, # 283 overall) in the 1989 NFL Draft by the Kansas City Chiefs.
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John Brown ……………………………. 45 yrd int vs USC, 1958
Craig Rutledge ……………………….. 45 yrd int vs Oregon State, 1986
Sherman Chavoor ………………….. 44 yrd int vs Washington State, 1936
Damien Holmes ……………………… 44 yrd fumble vs Rice, 2012
George Forster ……………………….. 43 yrd fumble vs Cal Tech, 1928
Trey Brown ……………………………. 43 yrd int vs Oregon, 2004
Dick Wallen ……………………………. 42 yrd int vs California, 1956
Donovan Gallatin ……………………. 42 yrd int vs Brigham Young, 1993
Phillip Ward …………………………… 42 yrd int vs Michigan, 1996
Spencer Havner ……………………… 42 yrd int vs Washington, 2002
Joe Sabol ……………………………….. 41 yrd int vs Purdue, 1950
Carlton Gray ………………………….. 41 yrd int vs Arizona, 1991
Ben Emanuel ………………………….. 41 yrd int vs Washington State, 2002
Mike Frankovich …………………….. 40 yrd int vs Washington State, 1933
K. Washington (J. Montgomery) … * 40 yrd fumble vs Washington, 1938
Jim Bright ………………………………. 40 yrd int vs Utah, 1973
Damian Allen ………………………….. 40 yrd int vs Texas, 1997
Eric Kendricks ………………………… 40 yrd fumble vs Washington State, 2012
Ryan Nece ………………………………. 39 yrd fumble vs Stanford, 2001
John Walker ……………………………. 38 yrd int vs Stanford, 1961
Michael Williams …………………….. 37 yrd fumble vs Washington State, 1992
Eric Kendricks …………………………. 37 yrd int vs Virginia, 2014
Jerry Jaso ……………………………….. 36 yrd int vs Washington State, 1969
Teddy Lawrence ………………………. 36 yrd int vs Washington, 1993
Marvin Goodwin ……………………… 36 yrd fumble vs Stanford, 1993

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UCLA strong safety ABDUL MCCULLOUGH (# 9) became only the third player in school history since the Bruins first joined the old Pacific Coast Conference in 1928 (and, therefore, first began to contest what can be loosely defined as a modern day-style schedule featuing collegiate competition of an elite caliber) to score a defensive touchdown after picking off a pass from Tennessee Volunteers superstar quarterback Peyton Manning on the road in Knoxville at the start of September in 1996.
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Tim McAteer …………………………… 35 yrd fumble vs Tennessee, 1965
Don Manning ………………………….. 35 yrd int vs California, 1966
Pat Larimore …………………………… 35 yrd int vs Oregon, 2011
Alterraun Verner ……………………… 34 yrd int vs Utah, 2006
Ricky Manning ………………………… 33 yrd int vs Oregon State, 2002
Del McGue ………………………………. 32 yrd int vs Loyola-Marymount, 1933
Allan Ellis ………………………………… 31 yrd int vs Pitt, 1971
Lupe Sanchez …………………………… 31 yrd int vs Stanford, 1983
Al Izmirian ………………………………. 30 yrd int vs Oregon State, 1942
Bert West ………………………………… 30 yrd int vs Oregon State, 1946
Everett Riddle …………………………. 30 yrd int vs Santa Clara, 1942
Scott Hooks …………………………….. 30 yrd int vs Pitt, 1968
Don Rogers ……………………………… 29 yrd int vs Stanford, 1983
James Washington …………………… 29 yrd int vs Oregon State, 1985
Tommy Bennett ………………………. 29 yrd fumble vs Arizona, 1995
Ben Emanuel ……………………………. 29 yrd int vs Washington State, 2001
Jarrad Page ……………………………… 29 yrd int vs New Mexico, 2002
Raymond Burks ……………………….. 28 yrd int vs Stanford, 1976
Tony Dye …………………………………. 28 yrd fumble vs Northwestern, 2009
Dennis Spurling ……………………….. 27 yrd int vs Washington, 1969
Chuck Cheshire ………………………… 26 yrd int vs Oregon State, 1934
John Brown ……………………………… 26 yrd int vs Stanford, 1958
Bobby Smith ……………………………. 26 yrd int vs Pitt, 1961
Byron Nelson …………………………… 24 yrd fumble vs Illinois, 1963
Michael Wiley ………………………….. 24 yrd int vs Houston, 1997

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ucla-havner-td
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UCLA Bruins linebacker SPENCER HAVNER (# 41) is escorted all the way downfield and into the end zone by teammate BRANDON CHILLAR (# 11) after picking off a Washington Huskies pass in early November of 2002 … Havner, who was named First Team All-America by both CBS Sports and College Football News as a junior in 2004, became the very first Westwood gridiron warrior to ever notch four defensive touchdowns in a varsity career three years later after returning a fumble for a touchdown against the Oklahoma Sooners towards the end of September in 2005.
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Jarrad Page ……………………………… 24 yrd int vs Washington, 2003
Myles Jack ……………………………….. 24 yrd int vs Virginia Tech, 2013
Bill Stits …………………………………… 23 yrd int vs Wisconsin, 1952
Spencer Havner ……………………….. 23 yrd int vs Oklahoma State, 2002
Eric Kendricks ………………………….. 23 yrd fumble vs Houston, 2012
Kenny Young ……………………………. 23 yrd int vs Nevada – Las Vegas, 2015
Pete O’Garro …………………………….. 22 yrd int vs California, 1956
Rich Gunther ……………………………. 22 yrd int vs Oregon, 1972
Greg Davenport ………………………… 22 yrd int vs Oregon, 1972
Tommy Bennett ……………………….. 22 yrd fumble vs California, 1995
Ryan Nece ………………………………… 22 yrd int vs Kansas, 2001
Marcus Turner ………………………….. 21 yrd int vs California, 1985
Ishmael Adams ………………………….. 20 yrd int vs Virginia, 2014
Roy Kurrasch …………………………….. 18 yrd int vs Idaho, 1942
Vince Bischof …………………………….. 18 yrd int vs Washington State 1968
Tommy Bennett …………………………. 18 yrd fumble vs Washington State, 1993
Mike Lodish ……………………………….. 17 yrd fumble vs Stanford, 1988
Ryan Roques ………………………………. 17 yrd int vs Houston, 1998
Billy Don Jackson ……………………….. 16 yrd int vs California, 1978
Mat Ball ……………………………………… 15 yrd int vs Oregon State, 2000
Spencer Havner ………………………….. 13 yrd fumble vs Oklahoma, 2005
Tom Waddell ……………………………… 12 yrd int vs California, 1972
Blanchard Montgomery ………………. 11 yrd int ret vs Michigan, 1982 Rose Bowl
Ben Hummel ………………………………… 9 yrd int vs Stanford, 1987
Akeem Ayers ………………………………… 9 yrd fumble vs Arizona State, 2009
Kermit Alexander …………………………. 7 yrd fumble vs Pitt, 1962

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UCLA cornerback ALTERRAUN VERNER (# 1), who stands level with four other players (Bill Stits, Lupe Sanchez, Craig Rutledge & Ricky Manning) on the Bruins’ all-time list having pirated 13 passes in his collegiate career, became the very first player in Westwood school history to haul four interceptions all the way back for touchdowns after taking a re-routed aerial to the house against the Arizona State Sun Devils in 2009 … Verner also returned a blocked field goal for six points against the San Diego State Aztecs in 2009 to conclude his term at UCLA with an impressive five non-offensive touchdowns.
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Kenneth Lombard …………………………. 5 yrd fumble vs Stanford, 2006
Christia Taylor ……………………………… 4 yrd fumble vs Rice, 2005
Akeem Ayers …………………………………. 2 yrd int vs Temple, 2009 EagleBank Bowl
Kory Bosworth ……………………………… 1 yrd fumble vs Arizona, 2008
Lloyd McMillan …………………………….. 0 yrd fumble vs Idaho, 1930
Art Piver ………………………………………. 0 yrd fumble vs Cal-Davis, 1932
Woody Strode ………………………………. 0 yrd fumble vs Iowa, 1938
Francis Mandula …………………………… 0 yrd fumble vs USC, 1950
Dick Witcher …………………………………. 0 yrd fumble vs Washington, 1964
Don Widmer …………………………………. 0 yrd fumble vs Washington State, 1967
Rick Kukulica ………………………………… 0 yrd fumble vs Tennessee, 1974
Eric Smith …………………………………….. 0 yrd fumble vs Oregon State, 1986
Scott Miller …………………………………… 0 yrd fumble vs California, 1990
Bryan Adams …………………………………. 0 yrd fumble vs Oregon State, 1991
Brian Allen …………………………………….. 0 yrd fumble vs USC, 1991
Abdul McCullough ………………………….. 0 yrd fumble vs Miami (Fla), 1995
Marques Anderson …………………………. 0 yrd fumble vs USC, 2000
Rodney Leisle …………………………………. 0 yrd fumble vs Washington, 2003
Akeem Ayers …………………………………… 0 yrd int vs Oregon, 2009
Gordon Jones ……………………………… unk yrd int vs Pomona-Pitzer, 1930
Art Steffen ………………………………….. unk yrd int vs Oregon State, 1946

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UCLA linebacker AKEEM AYERS (# 10), who just so happens to be the only Bruins player in school history aside from Blanchard Montgomery to actually record a defensive touchodwn in a bowl game, stretches the football out to reach paydirt after scooping up a fumble by the Arizona State Sun Devils in late November of 2009.
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This blog, “CLASSIC UCLA BRUINS, REDISCOVERED” is 99% certain that this above list accurately presents every interception and fumble recovery return for touchdown ever recorded by a UCLA football player since 1928 … (there are a handful of games from the late 1920s and early 1930s for which this blog has information on all the touchdown scorers but but remains unclear with respect to the manner in which all the touchdowns were scored).

In terms of research for this piece, the starting point was the “UCLA RETURNS FOR TOUCHDOWNS (SINCE 1957)” list that appeared in the 2005 UCLA Football Media Guide Non-Published Supplement:

http://www.uclabruins.com/fls/30500/old_site/pdf/m-footbl/05-mg-supplement.pdf?DB_OEM_ID=30500

Other materials consulted for this report include various annual UCLA yearbooks as well as a wide range of contemporary newspaper reports from the various decades.

NOTE — It is very important to remember that, according to the rules of NCAA college football in effect from 1929 until 1989, the defensive team could not advance any fumble that had already made any contact with the turf. During this time period, the only way it was possible for a defensive team to return a fumble for a touchdown was if the football could be captured in midair before touching the ground. In 1990, it was decided that a defensive team could advance a fumble that had made contact with the turf if the football had been coughed up at or beyond the line of scrimmage and two years later it was again permissible to return any sort of fumble from anywhere on the field.

UPDATED 09/27/2014 … to include results from UCLA vs Arizona State
UPDATED 09/05/2016 … to include results from 2015 NCAA season

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Establishing UCLA’s All-Time Placekicking Records

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September 9th, 1972 — UCLA placekicker EFREN HERRERA, the junior who had booted ten field goals for a Bruins team that had won just two of its ten games the previous season, sidefoots a short field goal with just 22 seconds remaining to provide the Westwood warriors with an incredible upset victory over the two-time defending NCAA champion University of Nebraska, a monumental loss which abruptly halted the mighty Cornhuskers’ 32-game winning streak. The native of Guadalajara, Mexico, who did not move to the United States until he had reached the age of fifteen, also played varsity soccer while at UCLA and made consecutive appearances in the 1972 & 1973 NCAA tournament finals, respectively, although the Bruins did succumb to the contemporary powerhouse of that era, St. Louis University, on both occasions. Herrera, who was a high draft pick of the Los Angeles Aztecs of the old North American Soccer League, ultimately chose to become a professional in the National Football League after setting a multitude of UCLA school records including most career field goals from 40 yards or more.
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MOST EXTRA POINTS, GAME
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5 ….. Joe Fleming ……………………………….. vs San Diego State, 1926
7 ….. Ernie Case …………………………………. vs Montana, 1946
8 ….. Kurt Zimmerman ……………………….. vs California, 1965
9 ….. ZENON ANDRUSYSHYN ………….. vs Pitt, 1968
9 ….. EFREN HERRERA …………………….. vs Utah, 1973
9 ….. JUSTIN MEDLOCK …………………… vs Rice, 2005
9 ….. KA’IMI FAIRBAIRN ………………….. vs Arizona, 2012

MOST FIELD GOALS, GAME
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2 ….. Joe Fleming ………………………………. vs Redlands, 1926
2 ….. Zenon Andrusyshyn ………………….. vs Tennessee, 1967
2 ….. Zenon Andrusyshyn ………………….. vs Pitt, 1967
2 ….. Zenon Andrusyshyn ………………….. vs Washington State, 1967
3 ….. Zenon Andrusyshyn ………………….. vs Oregon State, 1967
3 ….. Zenon Andrusyshyn ………………….. vs Oregon State, 1969
3 ….. Zenon Andrusyshyn ………………….. vs Washington, 1969
4 ….. Efren Herrera …………………………… vs Washington, 1971
4 ….. Norm Johnson ………………………….. vs Colorado, 1981
4 ….. John Lee …………………………………… vs Oregon, 1982
4 ….. John Lee …………………………………… vs Stanford, 1983
6 ….. JOHN LEE ………………………………… vs San Diego State, 1984

MOST EXTRA POINTS, SEASON
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12 ….. Joe Fleming ……………………………… 1926
18 ….. Ken Snelling …………………………….. 1942
22 ….. Ernie Case ……………………………….. 1946
23 ….. Bob Watson …………………………….. 1949
31 ….. Zenon Andrusyshyn …………………. 1967
33 ….. Zenon Andrusyshyn …………………. 1969
45 ….. Efren Herrera ………………………….. 1972
60 ….. Efren Herrera ………………………….. 1973
62 ….. CHRIS SAILER ………………………… 1998

MOST FIELD GOALS, SEASON
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6 ……. Joe Fleming ……………………………… 1926
6 ……. Kurt Zimmerman ……………………… 1966
11 ….. Zenon Andrusyshyn ………………….. 1967
15 ….. Peter Boermeester ……………………. 1978
15 ….. John Lee …………………………………… 1982
16 ….. John Lee …………………………………… 1983
32 ….. JOHN LEE ………………………………… 1984

LONGEST FIELD GOAL
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35 yards ….. Joe Fleming ……………………… vs Occidental, 1926
47 yards ….. Billy Bob Williams ……………. vs Montana, 1936
48 yards ….. Larry Zeno ……………………….. vs Air Force, 1962
52 yards ….. Zenon Andrusyshyn ………….. vs Oregon State, 1967
52 yards ….. Zenon Andrusyshyn ………….. vs Washington, 1969
55 yards ….. Frank Corral ……………………… vs Oregon, 1976
56 yards ….. CHRIS SAILER ………………….. vs Oregon, 1997

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ucla-john-lee-kicker2UCLA Bruins record-setting placekicker JOHN LEE (# 25) was the extremely accurate two-time All-America honoree (1984 & 1985) who still holds the NCAA single-season record for most field goals per game (2.6 avg, 29 FG in 11 regular season contests). Born Min-Jong Lee in Seoul, South Korea, the youthful “John” originally played baseball and soccer after arriving in the United States as a 12-year-old sixth-grader in 1976. A real scoring weapon from the very moment he first won the UCLA placekicking job as a freshman, Lee would set a new NCAA record by kicking no fewer than six field goals in one game as the Bruins barely edged traditional underdog San Diego State 18-15 in September of 1984 (this new mark lasted only a few weeks as matters turned out but still remains the all-time PAC-12 Conference standard).

Including the Bruins’ 39-37 triumph over the defending NCAA champion University of Miami Hurricanes in the 1985 Fiesta Bowl, the machine-like Lee totaled 32 field goals after 12 games for the UCLA Bruins as a junior in 1984. It is relevant to note that 32 field goals would be 96 points, or exactly 16 touchdowns with no extra points added. It is, indeed, rather thought-provoking to remember that ALL elite-level collegiate football contests produced a combined 47 field goals over the the course of the 1938 NCAA campaign (the very same year that junior left halfback KENNY WASHINGTON was the primary scoring weapon for Westwood’s gridiron warriors).

Unlike the accomplished Kenny Washington, who never got to play for UCLA in Pasadena, the acclaimed John Lee made three appearances with the Bruins in the prestigious Rose Bowl game (1983, 1984 & 1986).

Lee still holds the all-time NCAA record for most career games with at least four field goals made (six) and, significantly, the former UCLA Bruins placekicker also still shares the all-time NCAA record for most career games “in which field goal(s) provided the winning margin” (ten) … it is certainly most interesting to remember that Kenny Washington’s 1938 & 1939 UCLA teams could have changed the results of five of their football games from those two seasons had the Bruins been able to manage, in modern terms, either a ‘simple’ extra point or a ‘short-range’ field goal.

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UCLA Field Goals 1927-1966

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The official stationed under the goal posts at the back of the end zone looks up towards the sky in a bid to follow the flight of the football as the white-shirted UCLA Bruins attempt a field goal during the Pacific Coast Conference clash with their “big brothers to the north”, the University of California Golden Bears, at Memorial Stadium in Berkeley on October 17th, 1936. Thanks to a pair of touchdown passes from sophomore left halfback Hal Hirshon to senior right end Bob Schroeder as well as a 33-yard field goal from fullback Billy Bob Williams, the upstart UCLA Bruins were able to defeat the far more established California Golden Bears for the very first time in school history. Accordingly, jubilant UCLA supporters who had made the journey up from Los Angeles celebrated by joyfully taking down the goal posts.
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Talented UCLA right halfback JOE FLEMING kicked no fewer than six field goals while scoring 13 touchdowns and adding a dozen extra points during a spectacular sophomore campaign in 1926 but, despite scoring another nine touchdowns and kicking eleven extra points over the course of his next two varsity seasons, never did boot any more three-pointers for the Bruins ever again. Nevertheless, another 40 years would pass before Fleming’s single-season field goal total was finally equaled by KURT ZIMMERMAN, a senior who just so happened to be the very first true “kicking specialist” in the history of the UCLA Bruins football program. Furthermore, it was not until 1967 that another UCLA placekicker (ZENON ANDRUSYSHYN, the very first “soccer-style” placekicker the Westwood school ever sent out onto the gridiron field) was able to duplicate Joe Fleming’s notable feat of having kicked two field goals for the Bruins in any one game (that being against Redlands University in 1926).

Coincidentally enough, 1926 was also the very last year that saw goalposts on a collegiate football field located on the actual goal line, itself. Because of injuries directly resulting from this particular placement and the fact that the goalposts, themselves, sometimes interfered with play (specifically, in passing and punting situations), the goalposts were moved ten yards to the back of the end zone. Although the National Football League, in an effort to increase field goals and, thus, overall scoring, moved its goalposts back to the goal line in 1933 (where they stayed until the conclusion of the 1973 NFL campaign), the collegiate game never reversed its course.

ALL-TIME UCLA BRUINS : FIELD GOALS, FROM 1927 THRU 1966
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1933 ….. 27 yrd FG ….. Mike FRANKOVICH, vs Utah *
1934 ….. 25 yrd FG ….. Bill MURPHY, vs Oregon
1936 ….. 47 yrd FG ….. Billy Bob WILLIAMS, vs Montana
1936 ….. 33 yrd FG ….. Billy Bob WILLIAMS, vs California
1936 ….. 24 yrd FG ….. Billy Bob WILLIAMS, vs Oregon State
1939 ….. 40 yrd FG ….. Jack SOMMERS, vs Oregon
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1941 ….. 25 yrd FG ….. Ken SNELLING, vs Florida
1942 ….. 37 yrd FG ….. Ken SNELLING, vs Oregon State
1947 ….. 24 yrd FG ….. Benny REIGES, vs Iowa
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1952 ….. 27 yrd FG ….. Pete DAILEY, vs Stanford
1952 ….. 22 yrd FG ….. Pete DAILEY, vs USC
1955 ….. 25 yrd FG ….. Jim DECKER, vs Washington
1955 ….. 19 yrd FG ….. Jim DECKER, vs USC
1957 ….. 35 yrd FG ….. Steve GERTMAN, vs Illinois
1957 ….. 33 yrd FG ….. Kirk WILSON, vs California
1958 ….. 19 yrd FG ….. Kirk WILSON, vs California
1959 ….. 21 yrd FG ….. Ivory JONES, vs USC
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1960 ….. 27 yrd FG ….. Ivory JONES, vs Air Force
1960 ….. 19 yrd FG ….. Ivory JONES, vs Utah
1961 ….. 32 yrd FG ….. Bob SMITH, vs Ohio State
1961 ….. 26 yrd FG ….. Bob SMITH, vs California
1961 ….. 31 yrd FG …… Bob SMITH, vs USC
1962 ….. 28 yrd FG ….. Bob SMITH, vs Minnesota – (Rose Bowl)
1962 ….. 28 yrd FG ….. Larry ZENO, vs Ohio State
1962 ….. 48 yrd FG ….. Larry ZENO, vs Air Force
1962 ….. 35 yrd FG ….. Larry ZENO, vs USC
1963 ….. 23 yrd FG ….. Larry ZENO, vs Stanford
1964 ….. 25 yrd FG ….. Larry ZENO, vs Pitt
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1965 ….. 37 yrd FG ….. Kurt ZIMMERMAN, vs Michigan State
1965 ….. 31 yrd FG ….. Kurt ZIMMERMAN, vs Penn State
1965 ….. 34 yrd FG ….. Kurt ZIMMERMAN, vs Syracuse
1965 ….. 31 yrd FG ….. Kurt ZIMMERMAN, vs Air Force
1965 ….. 21 yrd FG ….. Kurt ZIMMERMAN, vs Stanford
1966 ….. 32 yrd FG ….. Kurt ZIMMERMAN, vs Syracuse
1966 ….. 25 yrd FG ….. Kurt ZIMMERMAN, vs Missouri
1966 ….. 17 yrd FG ….. Kurt ZIMMERMAN, vs Rice
1966 ….. 28 yrd FG ….. Kurt ZIMMERMAN, vs Air Force
1966 ….. 36 yrd FG ….. Kurt ZIMMERMAN, vs Washington
1966 ….. 21 yrd FG ….. Kurt ZIMMERMAN, vs Stanford

* Note — UCLA quarterback MIKE FRANKOVICH notched his three-pointer versus the University of Utah Utes in 1933 by means of the old “drop kick” maneuver and remains the last Bruins player ever to successfully kick a field goal in that manner.

Contemporary football fans seeking to understand just how rare successful field goal attempts were back when KENNY WASHINGTON starred at left halfback for the UCLA Bruins and, indeed, for many, many years thereafter, as well, might want to consider that, in 1938, there were a total of 47 field goals scored in all NCAA football games played, which translated into an average of just about one three-pointer for every five games contested. During the five-year period that led up to the outlawing of the flat placekicking tee in 1989, all NCAA football games played had produced a total of at least 1,350 field goals for five consecutive seasons straight – those figures translated into an average of roughly three field goals scored for every single game contested. So, in other words, the college teams such as the UCLA Bruins of TROY AIKMAN’s era were fifteen times more likely to successfully kick a field goal in any given football game as directly to college teams such as the Westwood warriors from the Kingfish’s time period.

It is very interesting to note that the UCLA Bruins struggled with placekicking even well after the NCAA liberalized the substitution rules in 1941 (which made it feasible for a certain specific player to come off the bench for the sole purpose of kicking extra points and field goals an unlimited number of times over the course of any given game). The 1946 UCLA squad that made an appearance in the prestigious Rose Bowl contest on New Year’s Day racked up an impressive total of fifty touchdowns in eleven games played that year with left halfback ERNIE CASE establishing a new school record by booting seven extra points in the 61-7 bombardment of the University of Montana Grizzlies. Still, the Bruins placekickers were barely able to convert more than half of their collective extra point attempts (54.0%) and also failed to kick even one field goal over the course of that entire season, as well.

The National Collegiate Athletic Association did change the substitution rules again in 1953, reverting back to an extremely limited policy that was very, very close to the old system that had been abolished prior to the 1941 college football season; the NCAA powers that be continued to tinker with the substitution rules until the modern-day “unlimited substitution” policy (which enabled teams to deploy separate offensive, defensive and special teams units in earnest) was adopted for the 1965 NCAA campaign.

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ucla-66-kurt-zimmerman-kicker
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UCLA Bruins placekicker KURT ZIMMERMAN (# 37) easily established a new school record for career field goals by booting eleven three-pointers in just two seasons. The 175-pounder, who, ironically enough, came by way of Redlands, California, did not attempt any extra points or field goals as a sophomore for the Bruins in 1964. Nevertheless, Zimmerman went on to smash all existing UCLA career records for both extra points scored (63) as well as accuracy (98.44%).
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Contemporary football fans might find it rather interesting to note that the overwhelming majority (40/52, or 76.92%) of all players on the 1964 UCLA Bruins varsity roster are listed as having a position on both offense and defense.
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The NCAA also made two significant moves during the decade that followed World War II in an on-going effort to generate more successful placekicking in the collegiate football game. The first major rule change, which came in 1950, allowed for the use of flat kicking tees that were up to two inches high. This development made it much easier for placekickers to “get under the ball” and, thus, prevent extra point and field goal attempts from being blocked by opponents who leap into the air with their arms raised high.

Even with the aid of the flat kicking tee, it was not until 1958 that the number of field goals scored in all Division I-A college football games finally reached a total of one hundred or more. So, for the very next season, the NCAA decided to extend the width of the goalposts to a measurement of 23 feet 4 inches. Still, the widened goalposts in 1959 did not produce an immediate tidal wave of field goal scoring (total of 109 field goals in all games played, an increase of just six from the year before).

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